Trump administration orders wildlife refuges employees back to work so hunters can hunt

Trump administration orders wildlife refuges employees back to work so hunters can hunt

Kerry Eleveld

As furloughed federal workers are being forced to choose between paying for cancer medications or food, the Trump administration is ordering staffers at dozens of wildlife refuges to return to work so that hunting season isn’t disrupted. 

Trump sons on safari in Africa. Trump administration tried to allow trophy hunting of threatened species early in term. Public outcry stopped the executive order taking effect.

Margaret Everson, principal deputy director of the Fish and Wildlife Service, sent a letter obtained by the Associated Press to 38 wildlife refuges directing them to utilize carryover funds to ensure that “opportunities, including hunting” aren’t lost during the shutdown.

As backlash over Trump’s unpopular and indefensible government shutdown grows, his administration has been trying to mitigate the blowback by making an ad hoc group of government services available, such as tax refunds and now, access to hunting. Turns out, those actions are also likely illegal. But legality has never been a chief concern for Trump—or really any concern at all.

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